Lemken replacing Rubin 9 for 2019

Since Lemken introduced the Rubin 9 in 2001, it has produced over 20,000 of them. It now hopes to build on the success of the Rubin 9, with its successor , the Rubin 10 which will once again differ itself from the competition.

The new model will be available fully-mounted (3.0-6.0m), semi-mounted (3.0m-4.0m) with the mono wheel system borrowed from the ‘big disc’ Rubin 12 (see profi 12/2014) or semi-mounted (4.0-7.0m) with the more familiar two-wheel semi-mounted running gear. The latter also come with hydraulic depth adjustment as standard

by Mervyn Bailey

3 Sep 2018

Since Lemken introduced the Rubin 9 in 2001, it has produced over 20,000 of them. It now hopes to build on the success of the Rubin 9, with its successor , the Rubin 10 which will once again differ itself from the competition.

The new model will be available fully-mounted (3.0-6.0m), semi-mounted (3.0m-4.0m) with the mono wheel system borrowed from the ‘big disc’ Rubin 12 (see profi 12/2014) or semi-mounted (4.0-7.0m) with the more familiar two-wheel semi-mounted running gear. The latter also come with hydraulic depth adjustment as standard

So what has changed. Well the larger discs (640mm versus 625mm) are now arranged in a symmetrical pattern, this will allow the harrow to be used shallow or up to a comfortable 125mm without crabbing says the firm. The disc concave has been tweaked ever so slightly and the metal made harder. The arms gain 5mm more steel too.

For those familiar with the ‘9’ auto-reset system, when it tripped, the spring hit a bolt putting stress back into the frame on the ‘10’ the bolt is gone so when the disc resets it sends the stress back into the ground.

The comb harrow gains the Rubin 12 crank adjustment as well as the hockey stick levelling tines behind the rear gang.

The 7.0m semi-mounted machine comes with gauge wheels in the front corner as standard and is an option on the smaller models. Also new is a straw harrow – two rows of spring tines. These have hydraulic adjustment connected to a pair of accumulators (one for each row) rated at 20 bar. If the load increases the tines kick back a little releasing some of the straw rather than loading the tractor.